Revolutionary War History: Well-Researched Novel

To the women in our family, I can recommend Daughters of the Revolution and Their Times 1769 – 1776 (A Historical Romance).   

The text was very helpful to me in understanding not only the well-researched events, but how these events might have affected the daily lives, actions and feelings of colonists. This is a source that can help bring history to life.*

For example, I had no idea that Parliament had passed legislation to make each colony a separate trade entity. Someone in New Hampshire with goods to sell to Boston could not simply transport them to Boston. He had to find an English ship and transport goods to England. Then the goods had to be transferred to another English ship and transported back to Boston…with the seller paying all costs and duties. Colonists had withstood these sorts of rulings from Parliament since 1696…more than 50 years!

1765 Broadside

This 1765 Broadside calls for the resignation of Andrew Oliver, Distributor of Stamps. Public Domain image from Wikipedia

With the Stamp Act, windows were broken by angry Boston citizens at the home of a British official. This resulted in the first two British Regiments being sent to occupy the city. Solders marched, idled away their time, drank and generally were rude, disruptive and dangerous to the colonists.

When the tax on tea was proposed, it was not excessive…the principal of taxation without representation was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Many mothers and daughters of Boston signed an oath to drink no more tea, and most were faithful for three years before the tax law became official. This resulted in huge surplus supplies of tea in London warehouses and hundreds of thousands of pounds in loss for the British-owned tea company. Several ships arrived with loads of tea, which the Boston colonists refused to be unloaded. A stalemate prevented ship captains from leaving without their ships being confiscated and themselves perhaps prosecuted for treason. British governors were deaf to firm negotiation from The Sons of Liberty…all of which escalated into the Boston Tea Party.

Through this novel, I better understand the early years of conflict that lead into Avery Mustain’s Revolutionary War service.

Here’s another resource that I look forward to viewing:

Sons of Liberty is a 1939 American short drama film directed by Michael Curtiz, which tells the story of Haym Solomon. It won an Academy Award in 1940 for Best Short Subject (two reels).

If you have favorite books or links, please leave a post and share with our family.

*I read the Kindle version, which was available at no cost when I downloaded. If you don’t own a Kindle, Amazon.com offers free apps for computers and mobile devices. I really love the Kindle for iPhone app, which is with me anywhere I’m waiting with a few minutes to read.

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